Abandoned Soviet resort

The old Plywood and Furniture factory outside Tallinn used to provide jobs for many thousand workers. This is an abandoned holiday home complex that used to belong to the factory. The furniture factory actually dates back to before the Soviet occupation time – but it’s closed now.


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Some 300 years ago this was part of Sweden. A bus stop nearby is still called “Swedish cattle”

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The factory was doing well and could afford what was then cutting-edge in design and location

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“Made in USSR” – plywood furniture from around here used to be sold throughout the Soviet Union

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Most of the interior remains in place: the location was little known and far from the city, so it never got looted
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The facilities have been quietly rotting away for about 10 years, with the original bar and recreation rooms intact. Occasionally, the new owners would have a short party here and then disappear again.

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Weekend recreation back in the days

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Pool table still going strong
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The original curtains are still in place
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The doors have been locked shut for many years
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Blueberry bushes and moss are taking over the roofs
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This used to be a state of the art sauna
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Sauna pool is overgrown with duckweed. You can tell by the large street lamp on top that this used to be Soviet establishment :)

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Getting an hour of scheduled time here wasn’t easy
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Sauna pool
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The area was lit by military grade spotlights at night

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They might still work

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Old tennis courts

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Standard light switches, used to be placed in many Soviet homes

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Alarm clock

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The factory itself declared bancrupcy a while ago, the old factory grounds are about to be converted to flats. Assets like these were bought by investors but never developed.

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Plywood and Furniture Works had its own football team with the imaginative name “Plywood and Furniture Works Football Team”. It’s the oldest football club in Estonia. It was still alive and kicking in 2008, although I’m pretty sure it got disbanded eventually.

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Entry at own risk

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The leisure facilities are close to the sea – which, being the country border, was a no-go zone. The whole area is fenced off by barbed wire.

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Private property.

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Old fire hose (The fire hydrant has mysteriously disappeared)

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Fire hook – there used to be a whole set of standard tools: typically a shovel, an axe and a fire hook.

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Someone is still using the grill

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Old Soviet style flower pots made of concrete didn’t change much after years of neglect – still just as ugly.

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Beehives where lamps used to be

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(Faint letters in Russian): “Don’t touch the buttons because the control mechanisms are not working anyway”

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The roofs will probably collapse within the next 10 years

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About pointofland

Bio keywords: Moscow, Stockholm, photography, travel, sailing, urban exploration
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